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DISCOVER OUR COURSES

Expert presenters

With over 25 years of teaching and department head experience in Australia and the USA our presenters are passionate campaigners for conceptual learning and for sharing these ideas with other teachers. They have inspired teachers across Australia and the USA with their passion for practical, hands-on activities which engage learners of all ages.


Practical Hands on courses

Learn Implement Share courses are practical and directly related to classroom teaching. In other words participants are able to use many of the resources provided and trial new ideas with their students 'the next day'.


Whole School or Whole Department Approach

Courses for Elementary School teachers are conducted using a Whole School Approach. Courses for Middle and High School teachers may be undertaken by whole departments or teams of teachers, as well as by individuals. Refer to the FAQ section for further details.


Online courses

The term ‘online course’ is insufficient as a category for Learn Implement Share courses. Yes, the content is delivered using an online medium. However, a more appropriate category of Professional Development would be ‘Blended Learning’. The reason for this is that, for the Whole School Approach and Whole Department Approach models, participants learn from the presenter via online videos, articles and regular feedback as well as from colleagues via formal and informal collaboration. Moreover, the ‘Implementation’ aspect of Learn Implement Share courses places them beyond the scope of a typical online course.

The Learn Implement Share Articles

These articles at Learn Implement Share Relate to the Teaching and Learning Process

Become a less serious teacher

Teenagers are rarely, if ever, motivated by seriousness. And yet, don’t we teachers tend to be a tad too serious in the classroom, when in front of our students? I’m not suggesting all teachers are inflicted by seriousness – I’m making a generalisation here – but perhaps a great many are?

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How Technology Can Improve Learner-Centered Teaching

Technology Can Improve Learner-Centered Teaching. Teaching with technology enables the instructor to create learning experiences that complement each other whether the students are working on an assignment online or meeting in a face-to-face environment. The technologies that support this goal include online homework, clickers and surveys.

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Let GeoGebra transform your math teaching

However, utilizing GeoGebra using the plug-in-a-data-projector-and-show-the-file method, is a powerful addition to the mathematics classroom, increasing engagement and deepening understanding in students. The huge upside is that using GeoGebra in this way requires no change in approach by teachers. All that is required is for the teacher to connect a data projector and demonstrate some files! And for the record, connecting a data projector to a computer does not constitute a pedagogical change. So let GeoGebra transform your math teaching!

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Developing conceptual understanding with GeoGebra

GeoGebra is a fantastic tool for fostering understanding in mathematics students. However, it is not a substitute for practice. Rather, when used well, GeoGebra allows students to gain insight into the mathematics at hand so that when they engage in practice they understand what it is they are doing. Developing conceptual understanding with GeoGebra is an outcome more middle and high school math teachers could explore.

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Investigating the calculus sequence with GeoGebra

To help cater for those interested in the application of GeoGebra to mathematics beyond the junior high level I am re-posting the following article by Kathy Tomlinson. Her original article can be found here. What I find powerful throughout the article is the strong push to have students enquire, explore, question and discover. Her approach is all about Investigating the calculus sequence with GeoGebra. Kathy’s approach therefore goes well beyond the (powerfully effective) plug-in-the-data-projector-and-show-the-file method mentioned above. From reading her article it is clear Kathy strives to allow students to ‘be mathematicians’.

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These articles at Learn Implement Share Relate to the Teacher Development in relation to Maths Teachers.

Minimizing student resistance when introducing change

When you are striving for improved student engagement, when you’re making a genuine attempt to cultivate a culture of learning in your classroom, you will be implementing some different-looking strategies with your students. You need to give those strategies the greatest chance of success. The last thing you want is to have half a dozen students voicing resistance during the early lessons. It is critical to build positive momentum.

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Improving student understanding with diagnostic interactions

The term Diagnostic Interactions refers to any teacher-student interactions which allow the teacher to diagnose the gap in understanding of the student. It is a significant technique in helping your students to understand. Diagnostic interactions are useful for all teachers, but especially useful for mathematics teachers. If you are a mathematics teacher, you probably engage in diagnostic interactions with your students to some level without even knowing it. By becoming aware of this process you will improve your ability to diagnostically interact with your students. Diagnostic Interactions are usually verbal, however are most effective when accompanied by diagrams or graphical analogies drawn on a whiteboard, or a page.

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Becoming an inquiry-based teacher requires more than knowledge!

‘When a teacher comes out from behind the lectern, leaves the front of the room, kneels beside a student to coach them through a problem, offers feedback designed to promote confidence and perseverance, and becomes a true partner in the learning process, the relationship between teacher and student automatically shifts. It’s no longer about telling; it’s about listening, observing, and creating the channel of trust that opens up a personal connection between two individuals.’

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Becoming an exceptional math teacher

Within this engaged learning environment, Alex is clearly in charge but not in a traditional way, rather more in a ’21st century learning’ way. Rather than being ‘the fountain of knowledge’ through ’teaching by telling’, Alex is the facilitator, the puller of strings, the weaver of learning threads to make the learning coherent.

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Sobering lessons from teacher observation

If I could go back and change my classes now, I would immediately: Dig deep into my personal experience as a parent where I found wells of patience and love I never knew I have, and call upon them more often when dealing with students who have questions. Questions are an invitation to know a student better and create a bond with that student. We can open the door wider or shut if forever, and we may not even realize we have shut it.

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These articles at Learn Implement Share Relate to the Getting with the times or 21st century learning.

Let GeoGebra transform your math teaching

However, utilizing GeoGebra using the plug-in-a-data-projector-and-show-the-file method, is a powerful addition to the mathematics classroom, increasing engagement and deepening understanding in students. The huge upside is that using GeoGebra in this way requires no change in approach by teachers. All that is required is for the teacher to connect a data projector and demonstrate some files! And for the record, connecting a data projector to a computer does not constitute a pedagogical change. So let GeoGebra transform your math teaching!

Read more

Developing conceptual understanding with GeoGebra

GeoGebra is a fantastic tool for fostering understanding in mathematics students. However, it is not a substitute for practice. Rather, when used well, GeoGebra allows students to gain insight into the mathematics at hand so that when they engage in practice they understand what it is they are doing. Developing conceptual understanding with GeoGebra is an outcome more middle and high school math teachers could explore.

Read more

Investigating the calculus sequence with GeoGebra

To help cater for those interested in the application of GeoGebra to mathematics beyond the junior high level I am re-posting the following article by Kathy Tomlinson. Her original article can be found here. What I find powerful throughout the article is the strong push to have students enquire, explore, question and discover. Her approach is all about Investigating the calculus sequence with GeoGebra. Kathy’s approach therefore goes well beyond the (powerfully effective) plug-in-the-data-projector-and-show-the-file method mentioned above. From reading her article it is clear Kathy strives to allow students to ‘be mathematicians’.

Read more

Five tips for student-led GeoGebra tasks

In this article we look beyond the plug-in-the-data-projector-and-show-the-file method into an even more powerful use of GeoGebra, that of student led GeoGebra investigations. Unlike the plug-in-the-data-projector-and-show-the-file method, student led GeoGebra investigations do require a different pedagogy to the traditional procedural approach as well as some serious planning and thought for the uninitiated teacher. So here are five tips for student-lead GeoGebra tasks.

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A Pythagoras investigation using GeoGebra

A Pythagoras investigation using GeoGebra. One day, I was playing around with GeoGebra and wanted to create a file which visually demonstrated the workings of Pythagoras’ Theorem. I had junior high school students in mind. I wanted the file to cause students to respond with “OK, I see that its true – the sum of the two smaller areas is equal to the larger area. The first file I created was the file dynamically represented below. NOTE: This is different to the one above – in accordance with the theorem it contained squares and only squares on the three sides of the triangle.

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Instructional math videos – three types

Instructional math videos are powerful. There are three types: Routine procedural videos, conceptually-based videos and activity explainer videos. Flipped learning looks like its here to stay. Flipped mastery classrooms can be revolutionary if implemented well.

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Examples of flipped math units

Adopting a flipped approach, especially a flipped mastery approach brings many associated advantages. The task of learning how to flip a classroom, however, is a significant undertaking, due to the vast number of considerations and decisions which need to be made. For most people, the skills required to flip a classroom are new. The video below features a series of snippets from flipped math classrooms created by participants of the Flipped Math Classroom. This 15 hour online learning journey is designed to be a comprehensive guide for math teachers for building one or more flipped mastery units.

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Flipped learning is not student management

The 21st Century is here to stay meaning that 21st Century learning isn’t going away anytime soon. Flipped mastery classrooms – well designed, comprehensive, student-centered online units of work – are powerful when supported by collaborative learning. Flipped learning is not student management. Know that the flipped mastery concept was never designed to solve student management issues. However, a flipped mastery classroom may allow the teacher great flexibility and focus to deal with student management issues.

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Common teacher concerns when flipping classrooms

The 21st C isn’t going away. Video is powerful. Well-designed, comprehensive, online units of work are powerful when supported by collaborative learning. The transition from a traditional, teacher-centric approach to a technology-rich, student-centered approach is a significant transition to make, requiring support, guidance and time for both the teacher and the students. Embarking on such a transition should not be about trying to get it perfect on the first few attempts. Many teachers have concerns when flipping classrooms.

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Flipped learning is student centered

Flipped learning is student-centered. In truth it isn’t student centered learning per se that math teachers fear. Rather it is the byproduct of student centered learning, namely student spread. When teachers step away from the safety and comfort of a traditional, teacher centered approach into the more organic territory of a student centric approach, the spread of students throughout a unit of work greatly increases. It could be said that student spread is to many math teachers as water is to many cats.

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